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$35,620
Starting MSRP
$35,923
Starting Mkt Avg
TrueCar Rating
Owner Rating
Pros

Reputation for reliability. Standard V8 engine. High-end models are less expensive than domestic brands.

Cons

Far fewer configurations than domestic-brand trucks. Lack of high-tech features. Poor fuel economy, even among big pickups.

Verdict

The Toyota Tundra is the oldest full-size pickup on the market, and you can tell. But if a reliable and straightforward big pickup is what you're after, it's still a capable and reliable option.

Pros

Reputation for reliability. Standard V8 engine. High-end models are less expensive than domestic brands.

Cons

Far fewer configurations than domestic-brand trucks. Lack of high-tech features. Poor fuel economy, even among big pickups.

Verdict

The Toyota Tundra is the oldest full-size pickup on the market, and you can tell. But if a reliable and straightforward big pickup is what you're after, it's still a capable and reliable option.

Overview

The current-generation Toyota Tundra was introduced back in 2007, an eternity in the automobile market. Toyota has made modest improvements and updates along the way. Still, the Tundra lags behind U.S.-brand pickups, all of which have more configurations, more tech, and more innovative cargo solutions than the Tundra. Toyota offers a single-engine, a stout 5.7-liter V8 that has the brawn to handle most towing chores. The two cab styles include a spacious CrewMax, and there are three different bed lengths available. The various Tundra grades range from work-truck basic to rugged off-roader to cowboy luxe. We'd also note that the Tundra is slated to be replaced next year, so Toyota loyalists who can wait it out will reap the benefit of what's likely to be a much more modern truck.

What's New for 2021

For 2021, the Tundra adds two special trim packages. The Trail Special Edition, based on the SR5 CrewMax, includes the SR5 Upgrade package and specific 18-inch wheels with a gray finish. Other features for the Trail Special Edition include the grille from the fancy 1794 Edition, black badges, a black interior with tan stitching, lockable storage boxes, a spray-in bed liner, and all-weather floor mats. The Nightshade Edition, based on the Limited grade, includes black leather seating, a dark chrome grille, and black exterior accents.

2021 Toyota Tundra Trim Comparison

Standard
Optional
Unequipped

* Additional Options Available

Standard
Optional
Unequipped

* Additional Options Available

Starting MSRP

Starting Market Average

MPG

Engine

Blind Spot System

Lane Keep Assist

Moonroof

Front Heated Seats

Cruise Control

Climate Control

Proximity Keyless Entry

Bluetooth

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Apple CarPlay

Android Auto

Wheel Size

Starting MSRP

$35,620*

Starting MSRP

$37,310*

Starting MSRP

$44,335*

Starting MSRP

$50,720*

Starting MSRP

$50,840*

Starting MSRP

$50,840*

Starting Market Average

$35,866

Starting Market Average

$37,547

Starting Market Average

$44,014

Starting Market Average

$50,352

Starting Market Average

$50,472

Starting Market Average

$51,294

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

MPG

13 city/17 hwy

Engine

5.7L V8

Engine

5.7L V8

Engine

5.7L V8

Engine

5.7L V8

Engine

5.7L V8

Engine

5.7L V8

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Wheel Size

18"

Wheel Size

18"

Wheel Size

20"

Wheel Size

18"

Wheel Size

20"

Wheel Size

20"

Trims and Pricing

The 2021 Toyota Tundra offers six trim levels: SR, SR5, Limited, TRD Pro, Platinum, and 1794 Edition. There are two four-door cab styles: the Double Cab with either a 6.5- or 8.1-foot cargo bed and the larger CrewMax that only comes with a 5.5-foot truck bed. The base SR trim is only available as a Double Cab; the Platinum and 1794 Edition are CrewMax only.

The Tundra starts at $35,620 (including a $1,595 destination fee) for the basic work-truck SR. The SR5 ($37,310) upgrades to an 8-inch touchscreen and nine-speaker audio system, but it mostly unlocks numerous options. The SR5's various option packages are an excellent way to spec the exact truck you want, which is how we'd do it, starting from a CrewMax base.

The Limited ($44,335) gets more upscale with navigation, leather, heated and power-adjustable seats, 20-inch wheels, LED headlights and fog lights, and dual-zone automatic climate control — much of which can be added to the SR5.

The TRD Pro ($50,720) comes standard with four-wheel drive. It's the off-road specialist with a unique suspension and a front skid plate. The TRD Pro also has a special grille treatment and 18-inch wheels with all-terrain tires. Other trims can be optioned with a slightly less hard-core off-road suspension and skid plates.

The Platinum and 1794 Edition, outfitted almost identically, are both priced at $50,840. They get blind-spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic alert, parking sensors, heated and cooled seats, as well as upscale trim pieces.

This is what others paid nationwide for a 2021 Toyota Tundra SR
How to Use the TrueCar Price Graph

The TrueCar Price Graph shows you new car sales data in a way that helps you easily recognize a fair price for a vehicle similar to the one you want. The vertical bars represent what people in your area recently paid for similar vehicles. These transactions don’t include dealer documentation, administrative, or similar processing fees.

How to Use the TrueCar Price Graph

The TrueCar Price Graph shows you new car sales data in a way that helps you easily recognize a fair price for a vehicle similar to the one you want. The vertical bars represent what people in your area recently paid for similar vehicles. These transactions don’t include dealer documentation, administrative, or similar processing fees.

  • What is MSRP?

    MSRP stands for Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price, sometimes also known as the sticker price. Because this price is only a suggestion, a dealer can choose to sell a vehicle above—or, more often, below—MSRP.

  • What is Market Average?

    Based on actual recent transactions other buyers have made, the Market Average shows you the average price others paid for vehicles similar to the one you want, while taking into account that most of these vehicles have different option combinations from the ones you specified.

  • Statewide, Regional, and National Data

    If there are insufficient transactions in your area, we calculate your Market Average by gathering statewide, regional, or national data. Because this data can come from a large geographical area it may not be as representative of your local market.

MSRP
$35,620
Market Average
$35,923
Compared to MSRP
0.9% above
Customize Yours
Excellent Price
Great Price

4% off - 1% above MSRP

$34,188 - $36,116

Fair Price
High Price
5
sales
40
sales
26
sales
2
sales
Select Style
Nationwide Data

This graph helps you recognize a fair price for the Toyota Tundra by displaying national new car sales transactions from the past 30 days. This data can come from a large geographical area, so may not be as representative of your local market. The prices have been normalized to account for transactions involving different configurations of this model.

Engine and Performance

Unlike the domestic-brand pickups with their myriad of engine options, the Tundra comes with just one: a 5.7-liter V8. Paired with a six-speed automatic, it makes 381 horsepower and 401 pound-feet of torque. That's in line with the Ford F-150's 5.0-liter and the Ram 1500's 5.7-liter V8s and is midway between the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra V8s. The domestic trucks also offer smaller engines that are more economical — including diesel and hybrid — and more powerful variants.

The good news is that the Tundra's engine works harmoniously with the six-speed automatic and has the muscle to move this big machine. The combo is smooth, and the engine has a nice rumble when you get on it. We drove the TRD Pro Double Cab, which comes standard with four-wheel drive. The Tundra's four-wheel drive is a part-time system that can only be used in slippery conditions and can cause wheel-binding in tight maneuvers on dry pavement.

The TRD Pro has a stiff, jiggly ride, although the 18-inch wheels have a sidewall to cushion sharp bumps. The vague, overly light steering isn't ideal. Parking is a chore owing to the slow steering ratio that necessitates a lot of wheel-winding, the massive turning circle (even more prominent in the CrewMax), and the lack of any camera aids beyond a simple reverse view.

Fuel Economy

The Tundra's fuel economy is pretty dismal. It's rated by the Environmental Protection Agency at 13 city/17 highway mpg for all variants. That's worse than other V8-powered big pickups. The rear-wheel-drive Ford F-150 with the 5.0-liter V8 is rated at 17 city/24 highway mpg, and the Chevrolet Silverado with its 5.3-liter V8 is similar at 17 city/23 highway mpg. Even Chevy's larger 6.2-liter V8 beats the Tundra with ratings of 16 city/21 highway.

Ford, Chevy, and Ram also have much more economical engine choices. Those include the F-150's 2.7-liter turbocharged V6 (20 city/26 highway mpg) and new hybrid (25 city/26 highway mpg), the Silverado's turbocharged 2.7-liter four-cylinder (20 city/23 highway mpg), and a turbo diesel (23 city/33 highway mpg), and the Ram 1500 diesel (23 city/33 highway mpg).

2021 Toyota Tundra Exterior Photos

Interior

It's a big climb up into the Tundra cabin, particularly in the TRD Pro, which sits 2 inches higher than other variants. The driver has a commanding perch, though the high hood makes nose-in parking a guessing game. The Tundra interior features chunky knobs and controls, and our TRD Pro had rugged-looking black leather with red stitching. The most luxurious Tundra interior is in the cowboy-chic 1794 Edition, with seats and interior trim decked out in brown leather and suede. Yet, it's not as over the top as the Ford F-150 King Ranch, Ram 1500 Limited, or the GMC Sierra Denali. Double Cab Tundras have four doors, but the rear doors are narrow, and the rear-seat legroom is cramped for 6-footers. However, the larger CrewMax is a different story as it has room to stretch out with an additional 8 inches of rear legroom and wider rear doors for easy access.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Except for the base SR, which gets a 7-inch unit, all Tundras feature an 8-inch infotainment display. Its split-screen capability shows up to three functions at once, and it supports Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and Amazon Alexa. Navigation is optional on the SR5 and standard on higher grades.

An 8-inch screen may seem pretty basic compared to the massive 12-inch displays available in the Ram 1500 and the Ford F-150, but Toyota's system is easy to use. Physical buttons directly access main functions, and volume and tuning knobs are present. Simplicity is this system's virtue.

2021 Toyota Tundra Interior Photos

Safety

The 2021 Toyota Tundra has a four-star overall rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), based on a frontal crash rating of four stars, a side-impact rating of five stars, and a rollover-protection rating of three to four stars, depending on the model. In the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) crash tests, the Tundra was rated "Good" in all crash tests, except for the driver-side small-overlap test where it was rated "Acceptable." The standard crash-prevention system was deemed "Superior," while the headlights were judged "Marginal," the same score given to the child seat anchors for ease of use.

All Tundra variants come with a forward-collision warning with pedestrian detection, lane-departure warning, and adaptive cruise control. Blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert are optional on the SR5 and Limited and standard on the top two grades.

Toyota Tundra vs. the Competition

All of the Tundra's competitors are newer and fresher than the Toyota. The Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra, and Ram 1500 have far more high-tech gadgets, more innovative cargo-bed features, and more powertrain choices. The Tundra is best for buyers interested in a more traditional pickup that shy away from newfangled tech and features. Toyota already has an enviable reputation for reliability, and having fewer high-tech options means fewer things to go wrong as the truck ages. The trail-ready TRD Pro is one of the more competitive Tundra variants. And while it's not as extreme as an F-150 Raptor or Ram 1500 TRX, it squares off nicely against the other brand's midlevel off-roaders. In the luxury realm, the top Tundras are shaded by the fanciest Fords and Rams. However, they're also considerably cheaper, with the 1794 Edition providing some rich but still tasteful interior upgrades.

Toyota Tundra Owner Reviews

Based on 232 Reviews
Overall Satisfaction
4.3
Performance
4.0
Comfort
4.0
Fuel Efficiency
3.0
Safety Technology
4.0
Features
4.0
All Reviews
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Efficiency
4.0
Safety Technology
5.0
Features
5.0
pros
Everything fits tight and no rattles or squeaks.
cons
Gas mileage, but it is improving
Submitted by Michael S on Jan 23, 2021|2021 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax 5.5' Bed 5.7L 2WD|Purchased on Dec 2020
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Efficiency
3.0
Safety Technology
2.0
Features
5.0
pros
Everything! This is my 2nd Tundra and in my 40 years of owning vehicles I have never been a repeat customer! It has more back seat leg room than any car I have ever owned.
cons
The navigation system is horrible!
Submitted by Michael D on Jan 22, 2021|2021 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax 5.5' Bed 5.7L 2WD|Purchased on Dec 2020
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Efficiency
4.0
Safety Technology
5.0
Features
5.0
pros
Great overall vehicle. Quality throughout. Excellent fit and finish
cons
Wish it was a bit more fuel efficient
Submitted by Doug A on Jan 22, 2021|2021 Toyota Tundra SR5 CrewMax 5.5' Bed 5.7L 4WD|Purchased on Dec 2020

2021 Toyota Tundra FAQs

The Toyota Tundra is currently being built at Toyota’s production facility in San Antonio, Texas. Prior to 2008, the Tundra was produced at the automaker’s Princeton, Indiana plant.

The 2021 Toyota Tundra has a towing capacity of 8,800-10,200 lbs, depending on the body style one chooses. Some rival full-size trucks can tow greater amounts of cargo, but the Tundra should provide more than enough strength for most owners’ hauling needs.

The 2021 Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup truck ranging in length from 228.9-247.8 inches. The CrewMax crew cab with a 5.5-foot bed comes in at 228.9 inches, as does the Double Cab extended cab with a 6.5-foot bed. The Double Cab is also available with an extended 8.1-foot bed, bringing the Tundra’s total length to 247.8 inches.

The curb weight of the Toyota Tundra ranges from 5,170-5,680 lbs, depending on the body style and trim level. It has a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 16,000 lbs.

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The Starting Market Average is a proprietary mathematical calculation based on actual recent transactions. It provides a statistically accurate understanding of what other buyers are paying for the least expensive configuration of this vehicle. Adjustments to the calculation beyond make, model, and trim are normalized based on detailed, anonymized transaction information. This accounts for the fact that most or all recently-sold vehicles included different option combinations. The data underlying the Starting Market Average calculation are filtered for extreme outliers and subjected to a weighted averaging process that considers factors such as the recency of transactions and the timing of data lags. In certain instances, the calculated result is adjusted to take account of abrupt changes in the market that may not yet be fully reflected by recent transaction prices. In all cases where the Starting Market Average is shown there is sufficient sample size and transaction detail to be statistically reliable.