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$25,965
Starting MSRP
$25,717
Starting Mkt Avg
TrueCar Rating
Owner Rating
Pros

An exceptional ride and handling. Spacious cabin and roomy trunk. Available hybrid version with excellent fuel economy.

Cons

No all-wheel-drive option. The base engine is paired with a less desirable transmission. The push-button gear selector is awkward.

Verdict

The 2021 Honda Accord is a leader among midsize sedans thanks to its precise feel on the road, spacious and well-designed interior, and efficient engines. If you're considering a midsize sedan, the Accord is a must-drive.

Pros

An exceptional ride and handling. Spacious cabin and roomy trunk. Available hybrid version with excellent fuel economy.

Cons

No all-wheel-drive option. The base engine is paired with a less desirable transmission. The push-button gear selector is awkward.

Verdict

The 2021 Honda Accord is a leader among midsize sedans thanks to its precise feel on the road, spacious and well-designed interior, and efficient engines. If you're considering a midsize sedan, the Accord is a must-drive.

Overview

The Honda Accord has reigned at or near the top of the midsize-sedan segment almost since the model's debut, and today's Accord is executed to a similarly high standard. Two gasoline engines and a fuel-sipping hybrid are offered. The Accord's suspension is its strong suit, marrying engaging handling with a comfortable, well-controlled ride. The current-generation Accord has a sleeker shape than its predecessors, with a fastback-style roofline. But the passenger space is not sacrificed for style, as the cabin and trunk are among the segment's roomiest. The Accord interior isn't as luxurious as some, but its quality is evident. Pricing is in line with most competitors, and solid resale figures bolster the value proposition.

What's New for 2021

The new Sport SE model replaces the previous EX. A rear-seat reminder feature is a new feature, as is a low-speed braking control feature that works at parking-lot speeds to warn the driver when they're approaching an object. An 8-inch infotainment display replaces a smaller unit in the LX, Sport, and Sport SE trims. All Accords now come with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and upper grades get the wireless version. The front USB ports have been relocated, and rear USB ports are now included on all but the base car. Finally, mildly tweaked front-end styling consists of a new grille and revised headlights.

2021 Honda Accord Trim Comparison

Standard
Optional
Unequipped

* Additional Options Available

Standard
Optional
Unequipped

* Additional Options Available

Starting MSRP

Starting Market Average

MPG

Engine

Blind Spot System

Lane Keep Assist

Moonroof

Front Heated Seats

Cruise Control

Climate Control

Proximity Keyless Entry

Bluetooth

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Apple CarPlay

Android Auto

Wheel Size

Starting MSRP

$25,965

Starting MSRP

$27,565

Starting MSRP

$28,425*

Starting MSRP

$29,915

Starting MSRP

$31,515

Starting MSRP

$32,285

Starting MSRP

$33,885

Starting MSRP

$37,435

Starting MSRP

$37,895

Starting Market Average

$25,677

Starting Market Average

$26,970

Starting Market Average

$28,048

Starting Market Average

$29,443

Starting Market Average

$30,629

Starting Market Average

$31,369

Starting Market Average

$32,784

Starting Market Average

$36,029

Starting Market Average

$36,481

MPG

30 city/38 hwy

MPG

48 city/48 hwy

MPG

29 city/35 hwy*

MPG

29 city/35 hwy

MPG

48 city/48 hwy

MPG

30 city/38 hwy

MPG

48 city/48 hwy

MPG

44 city/41 hwy

MPG

22 city/32 hwy

Engine

1.5L I4 Turbo

Engine

Hybrid 2.0L I4

Engine

1.5L I4 Turbo*

Engine

1.5L I4 Turbo

Engine

Hybrid 2.0L I4

Engine

1.5L I4 Turbo

Engine

Hybrid 2.0L I4

Engine

Hybrid 2.0L I4

Engine

2.0L I4 Turbo

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Blind Spot System

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Lane Keep Assist

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Moonroof

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Front Heated Seats

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Cruise Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Climate Control

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Proximity Keyless Entry

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Bluetooth Streaming Audio

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Apple CarPlay

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Android Auto

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

19"

Wheel Size

19"

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

17"

Wheel Size

19"

Trims and Pricing

The 2021 Honda Accord is offered in LX, Sport, Sport SE, EX-L, Sport 2.0T, and Touring trim levels. The Accord Hybrid comes in base, EX, EX-L, and Touring form.

The non-hybrid Accord LX, Sport, Sport SE, and EX-L all have the smaller, less powerful 1.5-liter turbo engine.

The LX ($25,965, including a $995 destination fee) comes with cloth upholstery, an 8-inch touchscreen, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto integration. The LX also includes the Honda Sensing suite of safety features.

The Sport ($28,425) adds a rear spoiler, larger 19-inch wheels, paddle shifters, unique seat upholstery, a power-adjustable driver's seat, and rear-seat USB charge ports.

Building on the Sport trim, the Sport SE ($29,915) adds more comfort features, including heated mirrors, remote start, and leather upholstery with heated power-adjustable front seats.

The EX-L ($32,285) drops the paddle shifters, larger wheels, and spoiler but dresses up the cabin with a sunroof, driver-seat memory settings, wireless Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto, a wireless charging pad, and a premium 10-speaker audio system with satellite radio.

The Sport 2.0T and the Touring trims feature the larger 2.0-liter turbo and a 10-speed automatic transmission. The larger engine is a worthwhile upgrade, but we would stick with the Sport 2.0T ($32,110) as it's well equipped and still nearly $5,000 cheaper than the Touring ($37,895).

The Accord Hybrid starts at $27,565, and that base version is roughly equivalent to the non-hybrid LX. In most trims, the hybrid cost premium is about $1,600, although the Hybrid Touring is $460 cheaper than the regular Touring. The base Accord Hybrid is about $1,000 less than the Toyota Camry and Hyundai Sonata hybrids, but the top-spec Accord Hybrid is the most expensive of the trio.

This is what others paid nationwide for a 2021 Honda Accord LX
How to Use the TrueCar Price Graph

The TrueCar Price Graph shows you new car sales data in a way that helps you easily recognize a fair price for a vehicle similar to the one you want. The vertical bars represent what people in your area recently paid for similar vehicles. These transactions don’t include dealer documentation, administrative, or similar processing fees.

How to Use the TrueCar Price Graph

The TrueCar Price Graph shows you new car sales data in a way that helps you easily recognize a fair price for a vehicle similar to the one you want. The vertical bars represent what people in your area recently paid for similar vehicles. These transactions don’t include dealer documentation, administrative, or similar processing fees.

  • What is MSRP?

    MSRP stands for Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price, sometimes also known as the sticker price. Because this price is only a suggestion, a dealer can choose to sell a vehicle above—or, more often, below—MSRP.

  • What is Market Average?

    Based on actual recent transactions other buyers have made, the Market Average shows you the average price others paid for vehicles similar to the one you want, while taking into account that most of these vehicles have different option combinations from the ones you specified.

  • Statewide, Regional, and National Data

    If there are insufficient transactions in your area, we calculate your Market Average by gathering statewide, regional, or national data. Because this data can come from a large geographical area it may not be as representative of your local market.

MSRP
$25,965
Market Average
$25,717
Avg Savings off MSRP
1% off
Customize Yours
Excellent Price
Great Price

0% - 5% off MSRP

$24,630 - $25,838

Fair Price
High Price
193
sales
418
sales
374
sales
115
sales
Select Style
Nationwide Data

This graph helps you recognize a fair price for the Honda Accord by displaying national new car sales transactions from the past 30 days. This data can come from a large geographical area, so may not be as representative of your local market. The prices have been normalized to account for transactions involving different configurations of this model.

Engine and Performance

The Accord's standard 1.5-liter turbocharged engine makes 192 horsepower and 192 pound-feet of torque. It's paired with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT). Output from the base engine is adequate, and the CVT is better than most. But we much prefer the larger 2.0-liter turbo engine with 252 hp and 273 lb-ft — this car is genuinely quick. And the well-mannered 10-speed automatic makes the most of the turbo engine's substantial power. The Accord Hybrid is rated at 212 hp and 232 lb-ft of torque, figures that top the output of the competing Toyota Camry Hybrid and Hyundai Sonata Hybrid. The Accord remains exclusively front-wheel-drive, even as rivals — including the Subaru Legacy, Nissan Altima, Camry, and Kia K5 — offer all-wheel drive for added traction in cold-weather climates.

We drove the Accord Sport 2.0T, and the car's cohesiveness is impressive. The weighty and precise steering is a joy, and it meshes perfectly with the composed chassis. The Accord loves to be thrown into a corner and maintains tight control of body motions. Yet it still shrugs off the broken pavement, even on the Sport 2.0T's 19-inch wheels.

Fuel Economy

The 2021 Honda Accord with the base 1.5-liter engine is rated by the Environmental Protection Agency to deliver 30 city/38 highway mpg. Those numbers drop to 29 city/35 highway for the Sport and Touring models. With the larger 2.0-liter engine, the estimates fall even lower to 22 city/32 highway mpg. With either engine, the Accord is competitive with its chief rivals, the Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima, and Hyundai Sonata.

The Accord Hybrid returns 48 city/48 highway mpg in base trim and 44 city/41 highway in Touring form. Impressive as those figures are, they're slightly below those of the Camry Hybrid and the Sonata Hybrid, although the Accord's hybrid powertrain is somewhat more powerful than those two.

2021 Honda Accord Exterior Photos

Interior

The Accord interior is stretch-out spacious. And at 16.7 cubic feet, its trunk is the roomiest in the class. The fast-sloping roofline means that rear-seat passengers must duck their heads while getting in. But once inside, they enjoy vast legroom and knee room as well as ample head clearance. The driver and front passenger face a broad but low dashboard. Small-storage space is plentiful. And everyone's phone can stay charged now that Honda includes two front and two rear USB ports. The EX, EX-L, Sport 2.0T, and Touring trims also add wireless charging. The lone exception to the well-designed switchgear is the shifter, which is an arrangement of buttons and switches rather than a simple gear lever. The controls have a quality feel, as does the interior overall, but it's not as luxe as some competitors. And the shiny cloth seat inserts in our Sport 2.0T test car seemed an odd choice. The Sport Special Edition, EX-L, and Touring have leather seating.

Infotainment and Connectivity

All 2021 Honda Accords come with an 8-inch central touchscreen that supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto (wireless in Sport 2.0T, EX-L, and Touring trims). But navigation and a Wi-Fi hotspot are exclusive to the Touring. Whereas some recent Honda infotainment systems have not been so user-friendly, the Accord system is simple. Its physical buttons flank the screen to take you directly to the main functions. Large knobs for volume and tuning are also most welcome. The only thing missing is a split-screen capability for the home screen.

2021 Honda Accord Interior Photos

Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) awarded the 2021 Honda Accord its highest rating, Top Safety Pick+. The Accord also has an overall five-star rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

All Accord models include forward-collision warning with pedestrian detection, lane-departure warning, lane-keep assist, and adaptive cruise control. Blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert are not included on the LX, Sport, Sport SE, or base Hybrid but are on all others. A low-speed braking control system warns when objects are in the way, and it can also automatically apply the brakes to avoid a collision. This feature is exclusive to the Touring trims.

Honda Accord vs. the Competition

The field of midsize sedans has vastly improved in recent years, and the 2021 Honda Accord still stands at the head of the class. Its precise suspension tuning, spacious accommodations, and all-around excellence contribute to its success. Honda's reputation for reliability and the Accord's top-notch resale value add an extra measure of buyer reassurance. However, the Accord is not the perfect car for everyone. For those seeking something overtly sporty, the Accord's Sport 2.0T is not as racy or as powerful as the Toyota Camry TRD, the Hyundai Sonata N-Line, or the Kia K5 GT. Compared to the Honda Accord, the top-spec Mazda 6 Signature has a more luxurious interior. Finally, buyers for whom all-wheel drive is a must-have will have to choose instead from the Camry, Subaru Legacy, Nissan Altima, or K5.

Honda Accord Owner Reviews

Based on 554 Reviews
Overall Satisfaction
4.4
Performance
4.0
Comfort
4.0
Fuel Efficiency
4.0
Safety Technology
4.0
Features
4.0
All Reviews
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
4.0
Fuel Efficiency
5.0
Safety Technology
4.0
Features
5.0
pros
I like all the things that come standard on the accord.
cons
I dislike that it turns off when you are at a stop sign and that you can only turn it off for that session, after you turn off your car and turn it back on you need to turn off the feature again.
Submitted by Paul M on May 10, 2021|2021 Honda Accord Sport 1.5T CVT|Purchased on Apr 2021
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Efficiency
5.0
Safety Technology
5.0
Features
5.0
pros
Everything except the infotainment system.
cons
The audio system should be better for a touring model.
Submitted by Harold H on May 07, 2021|2021 Honda Accord Hybrid Touring CVT|Purchased on Apr 2021
5.0
Performance
5.0
Comfort
5.0
Fuel Efficiency
5.0
Safety Technology
5.0
Features
4.0
pros
Honda elevated the accord to a luxury vehicle. High resell value.
cons
Does not have blind spot assist.
Submitted by Balisa M on May 07, 2021|2021 Honda Accord Sport SE 1.5T CVT|Purchased on Apr 2021

2021 Honda Accord FAQs

The 2021 Honda Accord has a base weight of 3,131 lbs in its entry-level LX trim with the 1.5-liter 4-cylinder engine. That weight increases to 3,327 lbs with the Accord Hybrid trim’s gas-electric powertrain. The heaviest Accord is the Touring, weighing in at 3,428 lbs.

The Honda Accord has been a perennial bestseller in the midsize sedan category for years. It has a reputation for reliability and a loyal fanbase of owners who love Honda’s engineering and sporty handling. The automaker has refused to rest on its laurels, and the latest Accord offers all of the modern safety tech drivers want, plus an available hybrid engine that can achieve 48 mpg. Some rivals tempt shoppers with lower pricing and extended warranty coverage, but it’s clear the Accord is still at the top of its game.

Pricing for the Honda Accord starts at $24,790 for the LX trim. It comes with a powerful 1.5-liter turbo engine, front-wheel drive, and a suite of safety tech to help avoid collisions on the road. The Accord Hybrid retails for $26,570, and it adds superb fuel efficiency to the mix. Honda also offers midrange trims like the Sport ($27,430) and EX-L ($31,290). Customers wanting the ultimate Accord should check out the Touring, retailing for $36,900. It comes with the Accord’s 2.0-liter turbo engine and many pampering amenities.

The Honda Accord is available in several trim levels, making it easy for shoppers to choose the best one for their needs. Families will appreciate the practicality and features of the base LX trim, while the Sport trims will speak to driving enthusiasts everywhere. The Accord is also available as a hybrid, providing great fuel economy with no loss to comfort. Thanks to Honda’s excellent engineering and attention to detail, top trims like the EX-L and Touring feel as pampering as some luxury cars.

People who viewed the 2021 Honda Accord also considered

The Starting Market Average is a proprietary mathematical calculation based on actual recent transactions. It provides a statistically accurate understanding of what other buyers are paying for the least expensive configuration of this vehicle. Adjustments to the calculation beyond make, model, and trim are normalized based on detailed, anonymized transaction information. This accounts for the fact that most or all recently-sold vehicles included different option combinations. The data underlying the Starting Market Average calculation are filtered for extreme outliers and subjected to a weighted averaging process that considers factors such as the recency of transactions and the timing of data lags. In certain instances, the calculated result is adjusted to take account of abrupt changes in the market that may not yet be fully reflected by recent transaction prices. In all cases where the Starting Market Average is shown there is sufficient sample size and transaction detail to be statistically reliable.